Beware The Complainers

Change is the only constant, don't let other people drag you down

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The Inner Game of Fortnite – Beware The Complainers

If you’ve participated in the Fortnite community for any period of time you’ve undoubtedly noticed the complainers. Aside from giant mistakes like the Infinity Blade and the B.R.U.T.E., any changes to the game produce complainers large and small. Everyone from the biggest, most influential streamers, to some guy on reddit, they all have something to say, it seems. It can be exhausting.

This edition is just a reminder to protect yourself and your mental state. It’s easy to let the complaints in and internalize them. It’s easy to feel the outrage that “the community” feels, when it’s really just a small, vocal minority who has some feelings today.

Bizzle gets roasted for his comment about how his favorite part of his day is waking up and checking what’s new in Fortnite, especially when Epic does something to throw the game into a state of flux. But what’s also awesome about Fortnite is that it’s constantly evolving, balancing, experimenting. I would love if some of my favorite games from the past could go through weekly evolutions like Fortnite does.

Think about that tradeoff: would you rather play a game that’s constantly evolving, making mistakes, but genuinely trying to get better? Or would you rather have a one-time release game where you get what you get, you don’t get any patches or anything new, and the developer just moves onto building the sequel to release in two years? I’ll take the former.

If you’re that mad at Fortnite, if it’s not bringing you joy, or you’re just not having fun, stop playing. It’s that simple. Otherwise, I encourage you to figure out how to handle the changes; figure out how to adapt. Change is the only constant. Miss things, talk about them with friends, but then accept where the game is now and figure out how to win.

Just because your favorite streamers believe something about the game doesn’t mean you have to. Just because reddit or Twitter is up in arms about something, doesn’t mean you have to be. Do you actually feel the same way? Consider it for yourself.

Part of being a great competitor is blocking out that which truly do not matter. Don’t let the other guys get you down. Ignore the noise.

Sub-Skill Drills – Tunnel Edits

This is something I’ve been working on and it’s helped my game a lot. What we’re going to do in this drill is to build a tunnel and then edit one of the walls, ideally not breaking our speed, so we can keep moving forward.

If you have Sprint by Default turned on, I suggest you turn it off for this drill until you get good enough at it that you can run through these.

  1. Let’s start our tunnel by placing a wall to our right. Then place a ceiling over your head.

  2. Next, walk forward, first placing another ceiling overhead, placing walls on our left and right so we have coverage everywhere but in front and behind us.

  3. Place a wall in front.

  4. Corner edit the front wall so you can proceed.

  5. Repeat steps 2 and 3: ceiling, side walls, front wall, etc.

  6. For a bonus, once you get good at this, make 90 degree turns in your tunnel and keep the front or side wall edits going as you proceed.

    If you’re doing this a layer above the ground, you’ll also need to place a floor below you before you walk forward.


Practice this tunnel and edit for 10-15 minutes, working on mechanics, not speed. The speed will come.

This drill is perfect to use in a mid or endgame when you need to move out in the open and you need to manufacture some cover for yourself.

Have a great weekend. Get those dubs.

See you Monday.

Water, Water, Everywhere

Tips for endgames over water: water walls, rockets, and height.

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The Inner Game of Fortnite – Water, Water, Everywhere 

There are a few different kinds of endgames: flat ground, hill climbs, hill descends, endgames in POIs, and now, endgames over water. Endgames over water can be challenging because if you get knocked into the water, your character behaves differently, building is a little different, you’re kind of a sitting duck – basically your world kinda gets thrown into disarray until you can build yourself a new foundation. If your opponent has height on you, it can make for an easy elim on their side of things.

We have to worry about deep water-based endgames if the final zones are in the center of the map, the top left corner, or the bottom middle. That’s probably 10-15% of the map, so let’s have a strategy.

The strategy is: water walls, rockets, and height.

First, water walls. When you build in water, the fastest way to get a floor below you is to build at least one wall as you sit in the water, facing the same level as the water. Don’t look up and build yet, build straight ahead. Once you get that first wall or two down, you can place a floor, jump, and start building up normally as if you were on dry land or in any other build fight.

Remember, the Fortnite build system places a second wall in the ground below the one you’re trying to place if the area where you’re trying to build the wall would have you build only a 1/2 or 1/3 wall because of the specific terrain. It doesn’t do this with stairs. If you try to place a ramp in the water, it will build a ramp below the surface of the water first and then you’ll have to place a second stair connecting to it in order to build your first floor. This can be disorienting and confusing, especially when people are shooting at us in a confined area. It’s faster and more intuitive to build a wall or two in the water, since the build system will help you out, then place your floor.

Second, rockets. You want to be able to knock anyone into the water at any point because we should always assume that they’ll be able to do the same to us. Whether that’s shooting your builds out or sending a rocket into your ramp/wall combo, you may end up in the drink. Be able to return the favor. If you don’t have rockets, try to push someone who does, get the elim, and take theirs.

Finally, height. Since you can fall into water without taking any fall damage, you don’t have to be as afraid of getting knocked down. Just know how to get back up to height quickly. Place those walls, then your floor, then do a 90 or two to get height so your enemies aren’t looking down at you like fish in a barrel.

I hope that helps! Remember: water walls, rockets, and height.

Sub-Skill Drills – Panic Water Building

Endgames can get intense, so let’s practice what we talked about above.

  • Load into a Creative, a Playground, or Team Rumble and land at any of the deep water areas.

  • Farm some mats so you can practice your builds, depending on your game mode.

  • Swim out into the water and practice placing at least two walls, then a floor, then hop the floor and do 3 consecutive 90s so you have height again.

Do that 10-15 times before you start playing so you start to build that muscle memory of what to do when things are crazy and you have to get out of the water.

Remember, good investment is boring. Practicing things when the stakes are low makes it easier to nail them when the stakes are considerably higher.

That’s it for today. What do you want to see from future editions of this newsletter? What are you struggling with? What should we cover? What’s your favorite thing that we’ve covered so far? Email me – zack@fortnitefundamentals.co.

If you’re enjoying Fortnite Fundamentals, forward this to a friend, duo, or squadmate. Help spread the word!

See you Friday.

The Tac Shotgun Got An ADS Nerf

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I’d love to hear from you, email me at zack@fortnitefundamentals.co. Feel free to send requests, things to cover, feedback, questions, or just a nice note.


The Inner Game of Fortnite – The Tac Shotgun Got An ADS Nerf

Late last week I came across this video from Upshall explaining how the Tac got a quiet nerf (powered down, for the uninitiated) so that hip fire is now less accurate and does less damage. As someone who prefers the Tac to the Pump, especially in the early game, it has me re-thinking what shotgun I pick up and use.

The tl;dr on the video is that in addition to the Tac getting a reduction in its headshot multiplier, it’s now more accurate when you ADS rather than spin around and hit a crazy flick shot. He shows a lot of examples and the video is definitely worth a watch.

I guess since we’re not getting patch notes this season from Epic, we just have to rely on content creators testing things out in Creative to see what might have changed.

Seems like regression to the state of the game, but I’m preaching to the choir here.

If you play like me and prefer the rapid fire Tac to a Pump/SMG combo, this might change up your strategy a bit. Quick tip today, give the video a watch.

Sub-Skill Drills – Ping Location, Throw Grenade

I’ve seen a number of pros do this and it seems like a solid thing to practice:

  • When you spot a place you want to throw grenades, first ping it so that your colored market shoots up into the sky.

  • Switch to your grenades, aim high and line up the trajectory to go into your marker.

  • Throw your ‘nades and hit your target with better accuracy.

Do this in your warmup or land somewhere like Pleasant or Salty, get some ‘nades and practice in-game if you try to third party a fight.

That’s it for today. Late edition, hopefully it finds you in time for some evening practice.

If you’re enjoying Fortnite Fundamentals, forward this to a friend, duo, or squadmate. Help spread the word!

See you Wednesday.

Defining “Good Enough”

Your training is deeply personal. Decide what success means to you.

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Follow Up From Last Edition – Flopper Clutch

This video from the Fortnite Competitive subreddit shows an insane win by someone in Arena using Floppers and elims to stay alive, navigate the storm, and come out on top. It’s a great watch.

The Inner Game of Fortnite – Defining “Good Enough”

I want to win every game. Every single one. It’s a good mentality to have. It want to get in there, play 20 games and win 20 straight. Obviously the chance of that happening is very small, not because of skill level but because of the randomness of each and every game of Fortnite.

I think it’s really important to be able to walk away from a game or a session of games saying, “I played really well, here’s what I’m proud of, here’s what I did well, and here’s where I can improve next time.” And as we’ve talked about before, you should write that down so you can come back to it in the future when you warmup or review your game logs.

If we don’t define what “good enough” means as we do anything in life, we’re likely always going to be disappointed. Sometimes good enough is an eight elim game, or getting coming in fourth in a really challenging endgame. Sometimes good enough is getting out there and getting a few reps in, keeping up our practice. Sometimes good enough is three solo wins in a row and then calling it a day. And sometimes good enough is just doing your routine, nothing special – warmup, some games, review, journaling, grabbing some food.

It’s important that we don’t compare our good enoughs to others’ good enoughs. Some people push themselves to a dangerous degree and are never happy, some barely push themselves at all. It’s about thinking for yourself, defining your own path, and then walking down that path. It’s not glamorous, but it works.

Sub-Skill Drills – Corner Edits

Part of drilling on a skill is drilling on it again and again. One of the most frequent edits we do is a corner edit, so let’s practice it some more.

- Go into Creative and build a 1x1 around you so that your edits don’t remove your wall, but you only need to practice on one side of the 1x1


- Practice 10 edits on each corner, going in both directions, starting at the bottom of the wall and going up and starting at the middle of the wall and going down to edit the corners.


- Remember: Do them slowly and controlled as you make sure you’re landing each and every rep. As you get better, speed up. The goal is not world-changing-scroll-wheel-reset fast. The goal is to be able to do a quick edit on an opponent in a game that’s not a simple window.


- Then: Try to do at least two corner edit elims in-game to get better at the skill, not the drill.

That’s it for today. Have a great Thanksgiving, if you celebrate.

If you’re enjoying Fortnite Fundamentals, forward this to a friend, duo, or squadmate. Help spread the word!

See you Friday.

Health, Fish, and Shield

Be smart about your loadout and carry more than you think you need.

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I’d love to hear from you, email me at zack@fortnitefundamentals.co. Feel free to send requests, things to cover, feedback, questions, or just a nice note.


The Inner Game of Fortnite – Health, Fish, and Shield

In America, Thanksgiving is upon us. If you’re in Canada, happy belated. As I was watching some FNCS this weekend, I watched a few players do something really smart: carry Floppers into the late game. (If I remember correctly, I think it was Bugha in Saturday’s Game 1 if you want to review the game). For the uninfishiated (sorry), Floppers are orange fish that you pull out of bodies of water that are quick to consume and give you 50 health, regardless of your current health bar. Minnows, on the other hand, the little silver fish, don’t work if you have 75+ health.

Bugha was carrying four fish and hung back with about seven people left in the game so that he was squarely in the storm, behind everyone. Rather than panicking, he confidently took some storm damage, ate a flopper, and took out an opponent so he was getting 50 health and then 50 heath and shield every few seconds. He was shooting opponents who weren’t even paying attention to him because they were just looking around for people inside the margin of safety, inside the zone. It was a brilliant little piece of meta engineering.

With little mobility in Chapter 2, Season 1, it’s important that we carry some kind of health and some kind of shield at all times. If you land closer to the corners of the map, the chance that you don’t get first zone is pretty good (by an estimate I saw on Reddit, there’s about a 40% chance that you don’t get first zone). So you have to start running early and forgo early game kills in order to not take storm damage.

Health and shields are plentiful in this meta so leaving health in favor of only shield feels to me like you’re leaving some Marginal Advantage on the table.

Consider two midgame scenarios where you’re carrying a shotgun, an SMG, and an AR:

  1. You’re carrying four Floppers and two Minis

  2. You’re carrying two Half Pots and two minis

You get caught in a build fight near the edge of a zone, end up in the storm, the next zone gets placed and you have a hike ahead of you, depending on your position. In Scenario 1, you have 200 health to help you get into the next zone. In Scenario 2, you have 150 shield that can’t help you in the storm at all, and can only help if you take additional enemy fire on the way to next zone.

I’ll take Scenario 1 every day.

In this meta, there are few times that I personally choose any non-essential weapon to health. That means I’ll leave rockets, grenades, pistols, and more on the ground in favor of at least bandies, if not Floppers or Med Kits. If you have two open slots, I’d consider:

  • Health and Shield of some kind

  • Shield and harpoon/fishing rod then swapping that for whatever you fish out of the water

  • Slurpfish in both slots if you can for maximum optionality (RIP Chug Splashes aka Chuggies. I loved those things)

Sub-Skill Drills – Giving Yourself Space in a Build Fight

We’ve all been in the situation where we’re climbing the structure that another player built. Maybe someone’s in a 1x1 a few layers up and we rotate around to the left 90 degrees, placing a ramp on the outside of the other player’s structure as we ascend. This is a dangerous position. We should give ourselves space so we’re not playing our opponent’s game.

What we’re going to do in this drill is the following:

  • Build a 3-5 high 1x1 in Creative that’ll represent an existing enemy structure.

  • Starting at the bottom of the 1x1, practice building away from the 1x1, switching from a ramp away into a few 90s to get to the same height while not being on top of your imaginary opponent.

  • Then drop down and do it again.

Do this 5-10 times in practice, then 2-3 times in game.

What we’re getting into our head here is giving us breathing room to take our opponent out how we want, rather than relying on their structure, which they have full edit control over.

That’s it for today. Fortnite Fundamentals will be in your inboxes Wednesday and Friday this week. It’s prime Fortnite season as the work and school years wind down so let’s keep getting into it.

If you’re enjoying Fortnite Fundamentals, forward this to a friend, duo, or squadmate. Help spread the word!

See you Wednesday.

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